Two unrelated questions...

Discussion in 'Maintenance and Troubleshooting' started by JohnF, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. JohnF

    JohnF New Member

    1. I have a two 2-year old Climatemaster TT27 heat pumps, and I noticed on one of the a greenish stain near the condensation pan (see attached photo). Does that look like a refrigerant leak, or condensation drip? There are no obvious stains on the copper tubing, the LAT delta is about 20 degrees in stage 2.

    2. Both units run on open loop, same well pump supplies house water, I don't know anything about the pump. I measured the current drawn by the well pump using a clamp on meter, and it shows around 8 amps. At 220v wouldn't that mean it's a 2+hp motor? Does that look normal? I expected about half of that, but I also heard that the builder/installer oversized the pump.

    Thanks.

    John
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Mark Custis

    Mark Custis Not soon. Industry Professional Forum Leader

    That is just clean NJ air running through the coil with water. It looks worse in OH.

    Mark
     
  3. JohnF

    JohnF New Member

    Thanks Mark. How about the well pump drawing 8 amps, doesn't that seem high? If that's normal, then that might change my view on using 1st vs 2nd stage. On both 2-ton heat pumps the compressor+blower measured around 4 amps in stage 1, and 7 amps in stage 2. Aren't the savings of 3 amps by running in first stage vs. 2nd stage more than lost by having the 8 amp pump run longer? The well pump has a CSV, so it runs as long as either heat pump is running regardless of what stage. I only have one solenoid valve per heat pump, so water usage also does not change between stages.

    John
     
  4. Mark Custis

    Mark Custis Not soon. Industry Professional Forum Leader

    Sorry that I do not know much about well pumps. Feet of head times gpm I get.

    Mark
     
  5. waterpirate

    waterpirate Well-Known Member Industry Professional Forum Leader

    The amp load for any given motor will change as: the motor wears, it has a load applied, it shears off the motor coupling. The only way to use a amp load to diagnose anything is to verify what you are starting with. Have a well guy pull it out, and read the capacity plate on motor and on pump.

    As a side note the older open loop systems were grossly oversized in regard to actual needs of the unit in relation to the pumping eqiptment.
    Eric
     
  6. JohnF

    JohnF New Member

    Thanks. I guess better too big than too small:D. As a side question, what should be a typical gpm flow on an open loop heat pump per ton? I have both 2 ton units set to around 5gpm, is that too high?

    John
     
  7. waterpirate

    waterpirate Well-Known Member Industry Professional Forum Leader

    Alot of open loops are fine tuned down to 1.5 gpm per ton, so yes 5 gpm per ton is wastefull.
    Eric
     

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