Pond Loops and Aeration

Discussion in 'Surface Water Loops' started by rajuncajun9, Jan 20, 2010.

  1. rajuncajun9

    rajuncajun9 New Member

    We are located in East Central, Indiana, have a one acre pond, 20' deep. We have a 5 ton Carrier geothermal unit with closed pond loops. We, also, have a Koender's Windmill with an air stone. What affects would this aeration have on the pond loops? Does aeration have harmful affects on geo in a pond?
    (you probably already know from other thread that my pond loops have floated to the surface stuck to the ice)....Could aeration really have made these pond loops float? Thanks.
     
  2. teetech

    teetech Member Forum Leader

    Aeration will take away heat. That's good in summer, not so good in winter for GEO.
     
  3. Palace GeoThermal

    Palace GeoThermal Well-Known Member Industry Professional Forum Leader

    If the loops are in a tight coil and not spread out, this would contribute to ice forming. The aerator will certainly lower the pond temps. Not having enough pipe in the pond can cause ice to form.

    Not having enough weight is what allowed the loops to float after the ice formed on the loops.

    So there are several factors at play here.

    I would not put a loop in a pond with an aerator.

    I understand why you want your aerator.

    Are the loops coiled or spread out?
     
  4. rajuncajun9

    rajuncajun9 New Member

    Dewayne, the loops are pretty much coiled up; last spring we had them come back out and put spacers (and they also added another coil).
    Your comment about not enough pipe was one my husband had as his thought was we probably need additional pipe if they have to come out anyway and do something just as soon add more pipe (is there such a thing as too much pipe???). It would have to be weighed down sufficiently so that if it did ice (or should I say 'will ice'), it didn't float up again.
    As far as the windmill aerator, we can move the airhead to the lower area in the winter...it hasn't been windy much here, haven't really noticed the windmill moving much; I doubt that is the cause.
     
  5. Palace GeoThermal

    Palace GeoThermal Well-Known Member Industry Professional Forum Leader

    Pond loops in Northen climates should be the slinky style, not coiled up. The coiled up version is for Southern climates. This is probably the biggest factor in your problem. See the attached.
     
  6. teetech

    teetech Member Forum Leader

    Very nice summary Dewayne I would guess there were several problems with this install.
     
  7. rajuncajun9

    rajuncajun9 New Member

    Interesting data sheet.
    The compressor and the piping going in to it had frost all over it externally; it was still trying to geo somewhat...tech had us shut it down overnight (used EM heat strips) to defrost the unit so tech could come in next day and check unit. Next day he couldn't find anything wrong when we put unit running again; then he and hubby went outside and discovered the loops were at the surface.
    We're not sure what caused the problems. We had just come out of one hec of a cold spell; three weeks of about 0 to 10 degrees in East Central Indiana. Now we're in the 20-30 degree range and the system is running eventhough loops at surface. Still a problem to be reckoned with.
     
  8. Mark Custis

    Mark Custis Not soon. Industry Professional Forum Leader

    If one is going to use a pond

    ....one needs to keep the loops in water.
     
  9. Palace GeoThermal

    Palace GeoThermal Well-Known Member Industry Professional Forum Leader

    Thanks...it is nice to be on a forum where so much good info is shared.
     
  10. zach

    zach Member Forum Leader

    Going thru files today and found this. I cannot remember who shared this with me last year.

    [attachment=0:2c8ivwhj]POND LOOP INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS.pdf[/attachment:2c8ivwhj]

    Z
     
  11. Palace GeoThermal

    Palace GeoThermal Well-Known Member Industry Professional Forum Leader

    Good info there. WF shows both styles of loops, doesn't say which style to use where. Climate Master says specifically that slinkys are for the North and coils are for the South.
     
  12. zach

    zach Member Forum Leader

    Dewayne

    You know much better than I on this: The slinkies are work to build v. coils but you are getting more surface area of the pipe exposed.

    Maybe the WF rep will chime in here on their recommended set-up relative to climate.

    Z
     
  13. rajuncajun9

    rajuncajun9 New Member

    Y'all have my attention...going read. Thanks. d :)
     
  14. engineer

    engineer Well-Known Member Industry Professional Forum Leader

    I wouldn't confine use of a slinky mat to a heating climate only. Down here in FL I'd want every bit of available heat transfer during summer cooling. We get pond water temps of 85+, so EWT would rapidly become a problem

    I don't see any benefit of a bunched up coil of pipe in any installation, other than ease of installation.
     
  15. Mark Custis

    Mark Custis Not soon. Industry Professional Forum Leader

    I can understand why a southern belle

    ..could turn into a rajuncajon, I am not sure about the 9.

    I would be happy to help make your system work.

    Mark
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2011

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